Why You Should Consider Hiring a Boat for Your Corporate Meeting in Sydney

Author: Sylvia James
Located on the east coast of Australia, Sydney is the capital city of New South Wales and the area where the first British colony in the country was established in 1788. The city is home to practically twenty per cent of the nation’s population, including a large number of ethnic and cultural groups from Europe, Asia, and Oceania. With its high quality of life, healthy environment, and a strong economy, it is not surprising that Sydney is ranked as one of the most liveable cities in the world. 

The Harbour City is also notable for its natural parks, architectural gems, cultural attractions, and, more importantly, for its glorious beaches. Take advantage of over three hundred kilometres of shoreline by opting to get a boat for hire in Sydney over renting ordinary venues for your corporate meeting. Talk business while cruising pristine waters instead of stuffy conference rooms for the following reasons:

 

Business Image

Your clients’ and competitors’ impression of your company is as important as the real thing. When you hire a corporate boat when meeting with top clients, you will not only give the impression that your company is competent and financially stable, but you value your partnership enough to offer the best as well. When practically all your competitors bring clients to fancy hotels, stay ahead and be different by showing the natural beauty of Sydney. 

 

Mental Focus

If you want all participants to focus on the agenda, it is crucial that you minimise, if not eliminate, distractions. Phone calls and interruptions from other people are common when you hold meetings in the office or hotel suites. 

Even if the disruption only takes a few minutes, it will take around twenty-five minutes for the brain to refocus and pay attention to the subject matter at hand. Imagine how inattentive everyone is even if they only step outside of the room for a minute or two. 

Keeping the participants’ focus will not be a problem when you are on a corporate boat since there are no outside distractions. Everyone present is involved in the discussion, which means every input will matter. Moreover, studies show that being near the water will make the mind more relaxed and focused. Thoughts are clearer when crystal blue waters are within view.

Creativity and Performance

Apart from improving mental clarity, there are research studies that support how being in or near bodies of water inspire creativity and boost performance. When you get a boat for hire to conduct your meeting, everybody will be more relaxed as they are surrounded by nature. 

Without stress and anxiety, creative juices will flow freely. You will be surprised that you can find better solutions and create better plans when you do work on a corporate boat than traditional settings.

Positive Mood

Breathing fresh air and looking at blue waters can significantly boost everyone’s mood, a lot better than icebreakers or chit-chat. Cruising for a couple of hours in a luxury boat can serve as a brief vacation for all attendees to reset their minds and feel more energised and happy. Experts assert that the mere sight of water can stimulate the release of endorphins, the brain chemicals that improve mood and provide feelings of pleasure.

Given the reasons above, it is clear that choosing a boat for hire in Sydney can offer numerous advantages that will not only help your venture grow but improve the corporate climate and positive feelings among the people in your organisations as well. Why would you do business inside meeting rooms with a mere view of neighbouring buildings when you can plan your success with the view of clear sky and blue waters, right?

Author Bio: Sylvia James is a copywriter and content strategist. She helps businesses stop playing around with content marketing and start seeing the tangible ROI. She loves writing as much as she loves the cake.

The following two tabs change content below.
Avatar

Guest Author

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and do not necessarily reflect the views of 'Mediatimes.com.au’.